When buying your first Bengal, or even if you and buying your second Bengal you may have some questions. So we thought that we would run through some of the questions we are most frequently asked so that you will be well informed when it comes to choosing you new family member.

What is a Bengal cat?
What is a Bengal cat?
What is a Bengal cat?
What is a Bengal cat?

The Bengal Cat is a domestic cat, a hybrid that has been bred to look like a miniature leopard. A Bengal cat is a domestic cat with its origins traced back to the Asian Leopard Cat (ALC) crossed with a domestic cat. The breed was originally started in the 1960's, and has continued to progress and develop since then. While their name "Bengal Cat" can be misleading to some, they are not related to the Bengal Tiger. They are one of the most intelligent and loving of all domestic cats, with a personality that is both endearing and unforgettable.

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Do bengals get on with dogs? Well what do you think?!

To answer this we thought we would post this comical letter from Stacy and Paul who have one of our cats.

Cats and Dogs
Cats and Dogs
Cats and Dogs
Cats and Dogs

Hi Mel & Dave,

Just thought I'd e-mail to let you know how our baby boy Chisel is going! Well as you can see from the photos he adapted to our dog Chad just fine. At first for his safety we muzzled the dog when they were introduced. Chisel was so little Chad could’ve snorted him up for breakfast.
It wasn’t long before we had to take the muzzle off the dog just so that he could protect himself. Chisel is forever beating up his big brother, with all good intentions of course and Chad loves the attention. They sleep together, eat together, drink together and play with each other! Chisel will even yell at Paul and I to let Chad inside if he wants to play with him. We were very surprised, even though we’d heard the rumors of Bengals habits, but HE FETCHES! Our dog Chad doesn’t even fetch. It’s so funny to sit on the couch and have this BIG American Pit-bull sit on your lap whilst you throw a ball for the cat to fetch. Chad even looks at Chisel like “oh, how can you be bothered”.
Paul and I would like to thank-you for ever having the opportunity to own Chisel, I was never a cat person, I bought him for my partner Paul. But Chisel is not like any other cat. He is just like having another dog (except all the talking). it’s a bit concerning when I come home and there’s Paul having a full on conversation with the cat and Chisel’s doing the majority of the talking.
As you can see from the photos he is very photogenic, every time you pull the camera out, or your phone, he drops to the floor and starts posing… He loves showing off his spotted belly. I hope you enjoy. Stacey & Paul

p.s: Dave, we now know why you said “When your laying in bed, never throw a ball of paper. You’ll have to play fetch for the rest of your life : )

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Are Bengals good with kids?

Bengals and Kids
Bengals and Kids
Bengals and Kids
Bengals and Kids

Yes, they are excellent with kids. (as all of our babies are raised in our home with our children) If Bengals are raised in loving environments with children’s interaction, they tend to have a special bond with children and as you can see from these photos (past kittens and gallery) our kittens do. Our Bengals to do tricks such as fetch and you should see our children dressing them up and wrapping them like babies it is very cute and it makes all our bengals love them all the more.

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How big is an adult Bengal?
Bengals Size
Bengals Size
Bengals Size

The average Bengal cat weighs between 6 to 9 pounds for a female and 9 to 15 pounds for a male. With some bigger than others. The Asian Leopard Cat is a small cat ranging in weight between 5 to 7 pounds. Thus, the size of the Bengal comes from the domestic side and not the Asian Leopard Cat as many may assume.

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What is the Bengal temperament/ personality?
Temperament and personality
Temperament and personality
Temperament and personality
Temperament and personality
Temperament and personality

Bengal personalities can vary of course, as humans are all different so are bengals, but overall they are curious, humorous and determined cats. They are social and want to be with you, and near you ((have a look at our testimonials) they even do your computer work for you, if you will let them lol.

Their personality is entertaining to say the least, and I have been told that you will find that most times it is hard just to have one and a lot of people that have one of our kittens come back for number two. They can be trained more than most cats, and they show signs of dog-like behaviors. I had one man buy one of our kittens for his wife, he told me straight out that he did not like cats and didn’t really want one, but he was getting one due to his wife’s pleading to have one. Then he came to visit me a few months ago and confessed to me how much he is in love with his girl, hehehe yes she had taken to him and he told me that he feels it is ok because she is a dog in cat’s clothes.

While the Bengal is a beautiful and graceful creature that attracts us all, their temperament shows us unique characteristics that keep us all coming back for more! They are extremely intelligent and can pick up walking on a harness and playing fetch quit fast, most of my cats taught me. One of our bengal girls, roxy has learned to flush the toilet and watch the water rush around in the bowl.

Our bengals are curious, active, loving, and they have an amazing memory. They usually like to sleep near or with their owner, with many of them adopting a special place at the foot of the bed. Although some people tell me that they cant have them in their room at night due to the fact that they get up a 2 in the morning and insist on playing. The Bengal is not a sleep-all-day, soak-in-the-sun type of cat, although they do enjoy this and as they get older do soak up the sun a lot more. They are loving, but still independent. Sometimes I think that they do things just to get you to laugh at them. For more first hand look at a bengals personality have a look at our testimonials.

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Someone asked me “Why are your Bengals kittens so expensive?”
Bengal Pricing
Bengal Pricing
Bengal Pricing
Bengal Pricing

So I thought I’d go in to a little bit about what goes in to the price of your kitten - so here are some of the factors that go in to owning a well organized cattery/breeding program. First of all the cost of buying breeding cats (our beloved mums and dads) When I say cost, a breeding kitten can range in price from $2000 anywhere to $5000, and a lot more for importing a cat, it would shock you! Then there is keeping up with health requirements, vaccinations micro chipping and desexing’s which all pet kittens have before they go to their new homes, this can be quit costly. Sometimes things can go wrong and a queen may need a emergency C-section which will cost upwards from $800, or one of the cats may become sick and this can reach in to the thousands and can be very heart braking. We feed our cats a quality diet, including fresh quality grade meats and a top quality dry food this also can be quite pricey.

Advertising our kittens and building a website, buying equipment, kitty litter, toys, show entries, and travel expenses, memberships, paperwork costs. Then there is all the time that goes in to making sure that all the litter trays are fresh and then feeding, playing and caring for all of our cats. Also the money that goes in to providing top quality clean housing and bedding for our cats. And building our new cattery has not come cheap. So hopefully this has explained what goes in to the price of each of our kittens. Good Bengals are not inexpensive; you generally get what you pay for.

It is true, you can find Bengal kittens priced lower, but in most cases, these will not have the bright colours and vivid markings that you see on Bengals pictured on websites and in magazines. There is a lot of expense involved in raising quality kittens, more than most people realize. Our kittens are individually evaluated and priced accordingly. Those that meet the Bengal standard, have the best markings, pattern, coloration and conformation, they are our top quality kittens and therefore are most expensive.

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Should my Bengal be allowed outside?

All of our babies are sold with the understanding that they are not to be left to be run free. Although this is something that we can not police so we thought we would write some of the reasons that you would want them to remain in-doors or in a cat run (please note, we do take our cats/kittens outside under supervision only). Cats that run loose outdoors have a much shorter life expectancy than indoor-only cats. Statistics show that indoor cats live up to 10 years longer than out door cats. Your cat is special and is part of your every day life now, and trust me it is heartbreaking to lose a family member even our 4 legged ones. They may be killed by cars, dogs, other cats, foxes. They might also be stolen by those who appreciate their beauty but don’t want to pay for their own. Outdoor cats are also exposed to diseases and parasites that indoor cats never have. You paid a lot for this cat and it has become part of your family and life why risk loosing it?


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Do I need to feed my Bengal something different from my other cats?

No. I would recommend a premium diet for any animal, look for ingredients that have meat as the first two or more ingredients and as few wheat’s/grain’s and fillers as possible. This is especially important for bengals, as they are carnivores and have sensitive stomachs, their bodies don’t utilize the nutrients in grains well and too much of this will lead to them having soft stools. I would also recommend that they are fed fresh meat one to three times a week (we feed our cats fresh meat every day along with a good quality dry food).

Then you can add things like natural yogurt, cottage cheese, vitamin supplements and tuna. You will find that if they have a more nutritious diet they will be far better for it. (the fillers in cat food is just passed through their body and becomes waste)(All of our kittens go to their new homes with a extensive information pack which goes through the food requirements.)

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When can I take the kitten home?

Most responsible breeders allow their kittens to go to new homes at 12 weeks of age or older. If you're used to seeing barely weaned kittens in pet stores, this might seem old but we are not a pet shop and our kittens are not just a commodity to us. Each of our kittens are very special to us just look at our past kittens. It is actually a good age to make the transition to a new home. At 12 weeks, a kitten is weaned, litter trained, has been vaccinated and has already been desexed. All the messy hard work has been done for you. They are more confident and are able to cope with the change of home better. Your kitten will still have plenty of comical, lovable kitten hood to go and trust me this is the best age and will provide a heap of fun.

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Do you ship your kittens?

Yes, our kittens go all over Australia and the world. Although we do like, when possible for new owners to come and meet their new kitten. But we realize that this is not always possible so we will freight all over Australia and internationally, and we will endeavor to find the best price we can and also the best way for your new pet to travel.

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What does it mean when I am told that my kitten is in the fuzzies?
Help, i've got the Fuzzies!
Help, i've got the Fuzzies!

The fuzzies mean that your kitten goes through a stage when their pelt looks all fuzzy with less clear markings. Like many baby wild animals, all Bengals go through an ugly duckling stage called the "fuzzies", where they lose the clarity of their markings before later regaining them with their adult coat. I was once told that this is because at this age that they are more vulnerable in the wild and this acts as a disguise for them from predators. Unfortunately, the "fuzzies" are at their worst at about ten weeks old, and start to come out of it at about 12 to 16 weeks. Although all kittens are different and may go through this at different times, and some may go through it worse than others. This is quite normal. It is best to see the kittens first (or a photograph of the kittens) at an earlier age, between two to six weeks old. This will give you a better indication of what the kittens will turn out like.

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Some questions you will want to know about your breeder?

How are the kittens raised? A responsible breeder puts careful thought and much care into raising healthy, outgoing kittens, and will be happy to discuss how this kitten has been raised. Here are some comments from one of our pet owners to show what will happen when kittens are not socialized properly -

Happy new year dave, melina and kids,
Have to congratulate you guys, must tell you, a friends friend has bought a snow bengal from another breeder about 4 months ago, their kitten hisses at them, is not litter trained, hides when people come over, is not friendly to them and they are not happy at all. Our friend of course is telling them about how beautiful Tarzan is, how people friendly/social he is and basically informing them everything yours is, Robyn and Nathans is the opposite, which is not pleasing to them of course. Everyone that meets our little boy loves him. Must get some pics of him fanging around the backyard ! ..... another time (oh, he is never outside without us, he loves a play in the garden chasing bugs in the grass, the chooks, and getting some Vitamin D)
Hope all is well with you guys and all your little spotty cats !!!
Robin & Nathan.

How are they housed?(see our cattery)
Hi Mel,
It was great to meet you today and we are both so very excited. Thank you so much for the time you gave to us today. You have a FANTASTIC cattery, I'd more call it the 'cats palace' hehe. It's beautiful, we could see how loved all your babies and queens are as we're sure you are with your studs also. I am "busting" at the seams as is Dale we can’t wait till our kittens come home.
Kind regards
Narelle and Dale


What are the characteristics of this breed? A responsible breeder will also be happy to discuss the breeds characteristics and special requirements with you. For example, some breeds require a lot of grooming(this will not be the case with bengals) others typically have loud voices; and still others are relatively aloof. Be sure you discuss the breeds characteristics with the breeder and decide whether they are right for your lifestyle and personal preferences. References from people who have purchased kittens from this breeder are always a good indication. A responsible breeder will be able to provide references on request. (see our testimoinials page)

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What about caring for my kittens claws (And Your Furniture)

Trimming your bengals nails is important, if they get to long they can cause injuries to you or another pet in play. Trim your kitten's claws regularly every 6 to 8 weeks. This is not hard and your kitten is used to it. Many people are concerned about causing their Bengal stress or discomfort, or about cutting the the small blood vessel called the quick (a pink colour in non-pigmented clear nails). Although once you learn to do it, it is almost as easy as cutting your own nails. And our kittens are use to this as we get them use to it for you, so they have no problem at all with this.

Choose a sharp pair of trimmers, they don’t cost very much from your vet or your local pet shop. Sit with your bengal on your lap, it is much better if you have someone to help. Applying pressure on the pad will extend the nails making it easy to avoid the quick. Remember you are only trimming excess nail, so start conservatively and trim regularly. It’s in a kitten’s nature to want to scratch. But this means they could try out your furniture! So provide at least one, or better yet, several scratching posts for your kitten as soon as possible. (The kitten has been used to using one at our house.)

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What about a scratching post?

I think all house holds with a kitten/cat needs a scratching post, it is the saving grace of the furniture. Contrary to what most might think, the cat/kitten is not doing this to sharpen their claws. Cats scratch for exercise, they also scratch to mark their territory. a scratching post should be tall enough to let your cat stretch out along its full length. Playing near the scratching post or even placing your kitten’s bed near it will eventually draw your kitten’s attention away from your furniture. If you find your kitten is scratching an object you don’t want it to then place your kitten in front of the scratching post instead. Encourage and praise the kitten when it uses the post.

Bengals are especially smart and know what you expect of them, although at times they can be defiant and look at you with a glimmer of naughtiness in their eyes and do exactly what they know you don’t want them to. Try not to pay to much attention to this because they are only seeking your attention, so just place them back next to the post for a scratch. Here are a few things that may help


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